Beowulf: Morris and Wyatt Chapter 13

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XIII. BEOWULF HATH THE VICTORY: GRENDEL IS HURT DEADLY AND LEAVETH HAND AND ARM IN THE HALL.

Naught would the earls’ help,     for anything thenceforth,

That murder-comer,     yet quick let loose of,

Nor his life-days forsooth,     to any of folk,

Told he for useful.     Out then drew full many,

Of Beowult’s earls,     the heir-loom of old days,

For their lord and their master’s,     fair life would hey ward,

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That mighty of princes,     if so might they do it.

For this did they know not,     when they the strife dreed,

Those hardy-minded,     men of the battle,

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And on every half there,     thought to be hewing,

And search out his soul,     that the ceaseless scather,

Not any on earth,     of the choice of all irons,

Not one of the war-bills,     would greet home for ever.

For he had forsworn him,     from victory-weapons,

And each one of edges.     But his sundering of soul,

In the days that we tell of,     the day of this life,

Should be weary and woeful,     the ghost wending elsewhere,

To the wielding of fiends,     to wend him afar.

Then found he out this,     he who mickle erst made,

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Out of mirth of his mood,     unto children of men,

And had fram’d many crimes,     he the foeman of God,

That the body of him,     would not bide to avail him,

But the hardy of mood,     even Hygelac’s kinsman,

Had him fast by the hand:     now was each to the other,

All loathly while living:     his body-sore bided,

The monster:     was manifest now on his shoulder,

The unceasing wound,     sprang the sinews asunder,

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The bone-lockers bursted.     To Beowulf now,

Was the battle-fame given;     should Grendel thenceforth,

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Flee life-sick awayward,     and under the fen-bents,

Seek his unmerry stead:     now wist he more surely,

That ended his life was,     and gone over for ever,

His day-tale told out.     But was for all Dane-folk,

After that slaughter-race,     all their will done.

Then had he cleans’d for them,     he the far-comer,

Wise and stout-hearted,     the high hall of Hrothgar,

And say’d it from war.     So the night-work he joy’d in,

And his doughty deed done.     Yea, but he for the East-Danes,

That lord of the Geat-folk,     his boast’s end had gotten,

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Withal their woes bygone,     all had he booted,

And the sorrow hate-fashion’d,     that afore they had dreed,

And the hard need and bitter,     that erst they must bear,

The sorrow unlittle.     Sithence was clear token,

When the deer of the battle,     laid down there the hand,

The arm and the shoulder,     and all there together,

Of the grip of that Grendel,     ’neath the great roof upbuilded.

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